Day 3 (Monday), Granada, March 10

After an early breakfast of muesli, yogurt, fresh fruit, toast, juice and coffee, we set off to Nicaragua Mia language school, where we’ll spend a lot of time this week.

Muesli breakfast

Muesli breakfast at Hotel Patio del Malinche, with yogurt, fruits, toast, coffee and juice

The school is just down the street from the hotel, El Patio del Malinche. More about that before we leave Granada. For a start, it’s an artistic haven, quiet, friendly, super-clean, air conditioned. The biggest downside is that Internet connectivity is not reliable. But, some other guests (Spanish-speaking) said, “It’s Nicaragua. Sometimes it’s there, sometimes not.”

Anyway, Kathy, Annabelle and I met on a language tour organized by Road Scholar in Costa Rica. Nicaragua Mia is NOT like any school we went to in Costa Rica.

Nicaragua Mia Spanish School

Nicaragua Mia Spanish School


Kathy and Diane at school

Kathy and I on the way to school, photo thanks to Annabelle.


Inside of Nicaragua Mia on a Saturday

Inside of Nicaragua Mia on a Saturday — it looks much brighter than it was.

I counted about eight students today during our “dinámico”, when we introduced ourselves. We had four Canadians, the three of us US, and a Norwegian. All the classes are one on one. Classrooms are cubicles, three on each side of the main room/building, and three upstairs in the building behind.

Classes in the Nicaragua Mia Spanish School

One-on-one instruction took place in small “cubicles” in the Nicaragua Mia Spanish School. This is the main room.


Because I complained, I saw both buildings — and my instructor Javier and I ended up in a large closet opposite the restroom. At least, we don’t have several conversations going on around us at the same time.

Class runs 8 to noon, with a break around 10. The school seems to have coffee and sugar, no cream, and water. Afternoons include activities for an additional cost.

Annabelle and her instructor

A little blurry, Annabelle and her instructor Johanna at work.

Kathy and her instructor

Kathy and Flavia read to each other, helping Kathy with pronunciation and comprehension.

Break at Nicaragua Mia.

Each day we had a break from 10 to 10:20 a.m. Students chat or read in the center of the classroom.


Not your US sidewalks -- these were uneven, varied from building to building and had no handrails to prevent your falling off.

Not your US sidewalks — these were uneven, varied from building to building and had no handrails to prevent your falling off.


Sidewalk near the hotel,

Sidewalk near the hotel, El Patio del Malinche. Note the step and unevenness.


We lunched today on the patio at The Garden Cafe in Granada.

We lunched today on the patio at The Garden Cafe in Granada.

After lunch we wandered around the Central Plaza area some more.

Horse-drawn cart in Granada, an alternative transportation method.

Horse-drawn cart in Granada, an alternative transportation method.


Fancy white grillwork plus paint on a laundry in Granada.

Fancy white grillwork plus paint on a laundry in Granada.


A tangle of overhead wires, Granada

A tangle of overhead wires, Granada


Sometimes "Stop" signs are flat, sometimes not... I found this one near the hotel.

Sometimes “Stop” signs are flat, sometimes not… I found this one near the hotel.


Kathy and Diane with feet in the pool.

Kathy and I cool off with our feet in the pool. Annabelle takes photos.


Dinner was down the street at La Claraboya. We’d been there Saturday evening, but opted to eat at El Zaguan.
Sign for La Claraboya, with stained glass piece

La Claraboya sign, one of the few examples of glass (besides regular windows) that I’ve seen so far.


I had spinach fettucine, which was excellent by itself, though it had tomato sauce served on the side. Annabelle and Kathy tried the corvina (translated as “sea bass”), and enjoyed it a lot. This was the same as what they had ordered at El Zaguán. They judged the fish better at El Zaguán (but just), but the veggies served with it much better. The coconut flan was definitely not as good as that of El Zaguán. Service was absolutely speedy and friendly, compared to all other restaurants we’ve eaten at so far. The real shame: the restaurant was nearly empty. Grade: 4.5 of 5 stars.

Advertisements
Comments are closed.
%d bloggers like this: