Day 4 (Tuesday), Granada, March 11

Please note: I thought the problems connecting to the Internet were solved; they’re not. Maybe it’s a setting in my computer, maybe it’s an incompatibility with the router in the hotel, though the owner says they use Windows 7, too — no problem. At any rate, it’s very frustrating.

Muesli breakfast

Muesli breakfast at Hotel Patio del Malinche, with yogurt, fruits, toast, coffee and juice

Tuesday was the usual — breakfast at 7 a.m., school from 8 till noon. In the afternoon, we went off to find the Café de las Sonrisas that Annabelle had read about. This time, we didn’t stop at the Central Plaza but kept on walking. This is NOT the tourist area. We did find some “art” places as well as the little café. What makes it special, aside from its very Nicaraguan menu, is that the people there are all deaf-mutes. The wall was lined with drawings of the various signs.

Sign language on the wall at Café de las Sonrisas in Granada. The employees are deaf.

Sign language on the wall at Café de las Sonrisas in Granada. The employees are deaf.


Kathy and Annabelle wait for their Nicaraguan specialty at the Café de las Sonrisas.

Kathy and Annabelle wait for their Nicaraguan specialty at the Café de las Sonrisas.


The wall of Café de las Sonrisas is lined with sign language examples.

The wall of Café de las Sonrisas is lined with sign language examples. The staff are all deaf-mutes.


Mosaic of small rocks at the entrance of Café de las Sonrisas.

Mosaic of small rocks at the entrance of Café de las Sonrisas.

Sharing its space was Tio Antonios Hamacas, Uncle Tony’s Hammocks. Annabelle thought she’d read where the people there were blind. That wasn’t my impression, at least not for all, but it was interesting.

Tio Antonios Hammacas, a workshop where you can watch colorful hammocks made.

Tio Antonios Hammacas, a workshop where you can watch colorful hammocks made.

Then we wandered farther from “home” and found another church along with Xalteva, one of the schools we had looked at (via Internet) for classes. It made a very good impression — a man greeted us at the door, invited us to look around and explained their program a little. Almost all were small groups (2-3), as opposed to all being one-on-one, as at Nicaragua Mia.

Iglesia Xalteva

Iglesia Xalteva, a church near one of the Spanish schools we looked into. It was across the street from a little park.

Our real goal for the afternoon was the Casa de los Tres Mundos Foundation, a cultural center.

Ceramic leaves form the donor tree at the Casa de los Tres Mundos,

Ceramic leaves form the donor tree at the Casa de los Tres Mundos Foundation, which offers art and music classes and performances and many other cultural activities. It has a print shop plus painting classes for all ages.

Mosaic of Dietmar Schönherr at street level.

The mosaic of Dietmar Schönherr at street level. It appears to be just shade of gray.


Photo from above of the mosaic of Dieter Schönherr

Photo from above of the mosaic honoring Dieter Schönherr, who apparently set up the Casa de los Tres Mundos Foundation. From below it looks like a bunch of tiles. From the second floor of the building, the camera sees the face.

On the way back we checked out some other places on La Calzada, the pedestrian street. After our usual preliminary Happy Hour at the hotel, we wound up at Pizzaiol for dinner. As its name suggests, most of the menu is pizzas: about 16 inches in diameter, very thin crust, made in a pizza oven. I had the margherita, which here was tomato sauce, basil and sliced black olives. Instead of peppers, we had oil with chili dissolved in it, which was the way I’d seen it in Switzerland. Very spicy but good.

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