Seichamps, January 17, 2015

Entrance to exhibition hall in Seichamps

Entrance to exhibition hall in Seichamps

I’m pleased to report I survived day 1 of 2 of the exhibition by Seichamps artists. Even better, the predicted snow did NOT arrive.

I set off early with Jacqueline for an appointment in Nancy. Then it was back to Seichamps in time to set up for the visit by Mr. Mayor and other special guests at 11 a.m.

View across the exhibit hall. My stand is at the very end and not visible here.

View across the exhibit hall. My stand is at the very end and not visible here.

Shortly after noon, we were all called into a central room, where the mayor and the woman who organized the event spoke briefly.

The mayor of Seichamps (left) welcomes the artists, as the organizer/his assistant listens.

The mayor of Seichamps (left) welcomes the artists, as the organizer/his assistant listens.

Mr. Mayor mentioned Diane Tucson, a glass artist (as reported twice in the local newspaper). The assistant/organizer informed him I was Diane Taylor of Tucson. After a short “apperitif”, complete with champagne and juice, cherry tomatoes, cheese cubes and mostly little dough goodies, people took off for lunch. I stayed and read. Some 25 artists — regional, not just Seichamps, are taking part. I’m the only fuser; we have a glass painter, several more traditional painters, a sculptor, potters, framers/cartonnage makers (boxes of cardboard, covered with fabric) and a calligrapher.

The event opened to the public at 2 p.m. I got pretty good at explaining what “fusing” is(looks English, needs a French accent to be correct). This is the third variation of what I do (as opposed to “verre fusé” and “verre fusionné”). I had some interestin g conversations, some of which I almost understood. One young guy, decked out in cowboy boots and cowboy hat, was looking for the American artist so he could buy something typically American. He was most disappointed to find pins and picture frames of the French flag (as requested by my friend Jacqueline). Turns out his mom is the really good watercolorist almost across from me.

Straight across is a group that does “encadrement et cartonnage”. I know cartonnage (making boxes, covered with fabric) from a French woman in Tucson. “Encadrement” is framing, including matting. Most of the pieces are just spectacular — I’ve never seen matting like this — odd shapes, five and six mattes, special cuts. My framer is really good and she does some creative things. But I’d say these folks may take a few steps beyond. I’m not sure how well this photo will show the artistry…

Wonderful example of matting (with frame) of floral painting. Each color in the circle represents a different color of matte used.

Wonderful example of matting (with frame) of floral painting. Each color in the circle represents a different color of matte used.

At any rate, I had some interesting discussions, met some new people and survived, all in French. People are quite nice about supplying words, so even when I stumble, I don’t fall. The show ended at 6 p.m. Jacqueline picked me up. André took a quick photo to show the new necklace and hanging earrings I recently came up with.

I'm wearing my newest creation: a necklace of dichroic triangles in gold, silver and magenta, tacked on to black. Hanging earrings match.

I’m wearing my newest creation: a necklace of dichroic triangles in gold, silver and magenta, tacked on to black. Hanging earrings match.

I almost fell asleep before and during dinner. I’m yawning as I type this. Tomorrow begins at a humane 10 a.m. I hope the weather holds.

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